1. Executive Summary

Wonder International Hospitals is a duly registered private enterprise strategically formed to empower health care delivery, assuring the patients that specialists, diagnostic and therapeutic tools will be made available to them for the first time in Ghana and the West Africa sub region, improving their health and saving the life of millions of people.

It was registered in Ghana on 20th February, 2014 at the Registrar-General's Department in Accra with the registration number BN587612014.

This proposal seeks to achieve extraordinary improvements in human health by providing all the specialties and specialists, all the latest equipment, a complete clinical and pathology laboratory, image diagnostic services, Critical Care Units for different purposes and a well-supplied pharmacy. With your collaboration, we seek to provide quality health care that will make a difference by improving the health of the people of Ghana and Africa at large.

This will the first time ever a project of its type is launched in Ghana and West Africa and it is expected to emerge as the health tourism facility in the subregion. Till now the major government hospitals in the subregion are better equipped both in gadgets and human resources to handle a variety and severity of conditions that the private hospitals, in their deficit, refer the patients to. As a result of this, the wealthy and the influential are flocking abroad to solve their health issues. Some who are middle class members of the society or are sponsored by the wealthy to go abroad do complain about the additional air ticket that needs to be paid for themselves and their families to India and South Africa. Let us not talk about Europe and North America where the cost of health care is exorbitant if you don’t carry a good health insurance. Foreign health tourism does not allow patients to recover in the emotional company of their family members and friends. Corporate organizations and government agencies are increasingly covering their workers with health insurance and we could positively tap into that for the sustainability of revenue. In the private sector, we shall not have paralleled competitors if our product strives to be affordably competitive.

As the experience becomes successful in Ghana, we will extend our tentacles to disseminate to the entire continent of Africa where except for South Africa, health care delivery in general, including hospitals, diagnostic tests and pharmacies operate at the lowest levels in the world. The payment capacity of individuals in most African countries is on the increase as most economies develop to enter the lower middle class range. African economies are among the fastest growing in the world. Today the continent is poised to transform the global economic landscape. Annual growth is expected to average 7% over the next 20 years.

We are proposing to your organization to have a joint venture with us to help solve the deficiencies in health care delivery not only in Ghana but also in Africa as a whole.

With this collaboration your organization will leave a legacy and ever be remembered in the annals of history for the good they have done to elevate the quality of health care in Ghana and Africa as a whole.

The Board of Directors of the Wonder International Hospitals, led by Dr. Emmanuel Yao Voado, MD., the Founder, with the astute collaboration with your organization, will select the Management Committee that will see to the day to day administration of the hospital. The hospital will be located in the heart of Accra, the capital of Ghana with 100 beds.

2. About Ghana

Ghana is located in Western Africa and borders Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, and Togo. This country occupies a total area of 238,533 square kilometers and has a population of approximately 29,786,408 as of January 5, 2019. The population of West Africa is estimated at 387,246,061 people as of January 8, 2019.

Formed from the merger of the British colony of the Gold Coast and the Togoland trust territory, Ghana in 1957 became the first sub-Saharan country in colonial Africa to gain its independence. Ghana endured a series of coups before Lt. Jerry RAWLINGS took power in 1981 and banned political parties. After approving a new constitution and restoring multiparty politics in 1992, RAWLINGS won presidential elections in 1992 and 1996 but was constitutionally prevented from running for a third term in 2000. John KUFUOR of the opposition New Patriotic Party (NPP) succeeded him and was reelected in 2004. John Atta MILLS of the National Democratic Congress won the 2008 presidential election and took over as head of state, but he died in July 2012 and was constitutionally succeeded by his vice president, John Dramani MAHAMA, who subsequently won the December 2012 presidential election. In 2016, however, Nana Addo Dankwa AKUFO-ADDO of the NPP defeated MAHAMA, marking the third time that the Ghana’s presidency has changed parties since the return to democracy.

Economy:

Ghana has a market-based economy with relatively few policy barriers to trade and investment in comparison with other countries in the region, and Ghana is endowed with natural resources. Ghana's economy was strengthened by a quarter century of relatively sound management, a competitive business environment, and sustained reductions in poverty levels, but in recent years has suffered the consequences of loose fiscal policy, high budget and current account deficits, and a depreciating currency.
Agriculture accounts for about 20% of GDP and employs more than half of the workforce, mainly small landholders. Gold, oil, and cocoa exports, and individual remittances, are major sources of foreign exchange. Expansion of Ghana’s nascent oil industry has boosted economic growth, but the fall in oil prices since 2015 reduced by half Ghana’s oil revenue. Production at Jubilee, Ghana's first commercial offshore oilfield, began in mid-December 2010. Production from two more fields, TEN and Sankofa, started in 2016 and 2017 respectively. The country’s first gas processing plant at Atuabo is also producing natural gas from the Jubilee field, providing power to several of Ghana’s thermal power plants.
As of 2018, key economic concerns facing the government include the lack of affordable electricity, lack of a solid domestic revenue base, and the high debt burden. The AKUFO-ADDO administration has made some progress by committing to fiscal consolidation, but much work is still to be done. Ghana signed a $920 million extended credit facility with the IMF in April 2015 to help it address its growing economic crisis. The IMF fiscal targets require Ghana to reduce the deficit by cutting subsidies, decreasing the bloated public sector wage bill, strengthening revenue administration, boosting tax revenues, and improving the health of Ghana’s banking sector. Priorities for the new administration include rescheduling some of Ghana’s $31 billion debt, stimulating economic growth, reducing inflation, and stabilizing the currency. Prospects for new oil and gas production and follow through on tighter fiscal management are likely to help Ghana’s economy in 2018.
GDP (purchasing power parity): $134 billion (2017 est.)
GDP (official exchange rate): $47.02 billion (2017 est.) (2017 est.)
GDP - real growth rate: 8.4% (2017 est.)
GDP - per capita (PPP): $4,700 (2017 est.)

GDP - composition, by end use:

household consumption: 80.1% (2017 est.)

government consumption: 8.6% (2017 est.)

investment in fixed capital: 13.7% (2017 est.)

investment in inventories: 1.1% (2017 est.)

exports of goods and services: 43% (2017 est.)

imports of goods and services: -46.5% (2017 est.)

GDP - composition, by sector of origin:
agriculture: 18.3% (2017 est.)
industry: 24.5% (2017 est.)
services: 57.2% (2017 est.)

Agriculture - products: cocoa, rice, cassava (manioc, tapioca), peanuts, corn, shea nuts, bananas; timber
Industries: mining, lumbering, light manufacturing, aluminum smelting, food processing, cement, small commercial ship building, petroleum
Industrial production growth rate: 16.7% (2017 est.)

Labor force: 12.49 million (2017 est.)

Labor force - by occupation:
agriculture: 44.7%
industry: 14.4%
services: 40.9% (2013 est.)

Inflation rate (consumer prices): 9.6 % ( July,2018.)

3. About Africa

Africa is the second-largest continent about 30.2 million km2 (11.7 million sq. mi), after Asia, in size and population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, both the Suez Canal and the Red Sea along the Sinai Peninsula to the northeast, the Indian Ocean to the southeast, the Atlantic Ocean to the west and Europe to the north. The continent includes Madagascar and various archipelagos.

The population of Africa is estimated at 1.17 billion people as of 2015 accounting for about 16.7% of the world's human population.  Africa's population is the youngest among all the continents; 50% of Africans are 19 years old or younger. Algeria is Africa's largest country by area and Nigeria is the largest by population.

Africa, particularly central Eastern Africa, is widely accepted as the place of origin of humans and the Hominidae clade (great apes), as evidenced by the discovery of the earliest hominids and their ancestors, as well as later ones that have been dated to around seven million years ago.

History:

At about 3300 BC, the historical record opens in Northern Africa with the rise of literacy in the Pharaonic civilization of Ancient Egypt. One of the world's earliest and longest-lasting civilizations, the Egyptian state continued, with varying levels of influence over other areas, until 343 BC.

Climate:

Africa straddles the equator and encompasses numerous climate areas; it is the only continent to stretch from the northern temperate to southern temperate zones.

The climate of Africa ranges from tropical to subarctic on its highest peaks. Its northern half is primarily desert, or arid, while its central and southern areas contain both savanna plains and very dense jungle (rainforest) regions. In between, there is a convergence, where vegetation patterns such as Sahel and steppe dominate. Africa is the hottest continent on earth and 60% of the entire land surface consists of dry lands and deserts.

Politics:

Today, Africa contains 54 sovereign countries, nine territories and two de facto independent states with limited or no recognition. Connected with the Indian Ocean the islands of Africa are the Union of the Comoros, Republic of Madagascar, Republic of Seychelles, and Republic of Mauritius. In the Atlantic Ocean we have Republic of Cape Verde, Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe. Others are Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, and Eritrea.

The vast majority of African states are republics that operate under some form of the presidential system of rule. The improved stability and economic reforms have led to a great increase in foreign investment into many African nations, mainly from China, which has spurred quick economic growth in many countries, seemingly ending decades of stagnation and decline.

Some seven African countries are in the top 10 fastest growing economies in the world. If you look at countries like Mozambique, Angola, Ethiopia, Zambia, and Togo – all of those markets have shown exceptional growth and real stability and with that you almost get a new investment climate for these countries. This allows you to have a new emerging middle class and with that comes a very vibrant entrepreneurship culture, businessmen or women who want access to technology and to innovate.

Several African economies are among the world’s fastest growing as of 2011. As of 2013, these are some of the Africa countries growing by more than 5.0% in real Gross Domestic Product (GDP). These are South Sudan, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Rwanda, Mozambique, Eritrea, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Gabon, Burkina Faso, The Gambia, Mauritania, Niger, Congo, Zambia, Angola, Uganda, Togo, Nigeria, Morocco and Kenya.

4. Personal Profile

Born in 1971 to a Christian family of scarce resources in Tefle, Volta Region, Ghana, he always dreamed of breaking the back bone of poverty through education. At the age of 12, he received a prophecy that he would be going abroad to further his education. In 1985, at age 14, the prophecy was accomplished but not without difficulties. After taking the exams to send students to Cuba, he placed first in his district but was unlawfully replaced by the son of the most powerful politician of the district. A concerned citizen sent him to the office of President Jerry John Rawlings, when he was allowed to participate in the national test in which he became first. This event was indeed a shock to many.

He was in Cuba for 17 years, right from the junior high school to the medical school and subsequently to the postgraduate specialist course of Neurosurgery. While in Cuba as a student, he continued the brilliant academic work; he won many awards including best student in Chemistry at the Cuban National Level Quizzes for 3 consecutive years where students from 35 countries then studied. He wrote an Organic Chemistry book which was meant for the preparation of the high performance students who aspired to participate in the World Olympiad of Chemistry. He was summa cum laude (first) in all the levels of education including the medical school and the Specialty of Neurosurgery. At the end of the neurosurgical training, he wrote another book in the field of Spinal Surgery called Lumbosacral Discopathies.

When he completed the Neurosurgical course in 2001, the people of Belize found him and took him to that country as they needed Neurosurgical Services which they had never had the privilege of enjoying locally. He performed simple and complex surgeries on many people including the elite of Belize with no surgical mortality in his 5 consecutive years of practice. In the USA, under Dr. Robert Grossman, a well-known neurosurgeon, he worked as a Clinical Research Specialist where he was invited by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons of America to present six papers in their international conferences.

He is Belizean and American citizen by naturalization. After 28 years, he has decided to come back to Africa to help his people as he has come to the convincing realization that he is more needed here than in the United States of America.

5. Track Record

Dr. Emmanuel Voado, MD., is a Ghanaian neurosurgeon trained in Cuba. He was the medical doctor who first opened a neurosurgical service in the country of Belize. He practiced there for 5 years before going to the United States where he resided with his family for 6 years before relocating to Africa in September, 2013.

In Cuba, he was directly involved in the educational system for 17 years and impacted by their health care delivery for 11 years which can all be emulated by third world countries like Ghana who have more natural resources and foreign exchange earners than Cuba.

He lived in Belize where he contributed to the health care delivery in that nation. Once in the USA, he was personally impacted by all the good things of the American system.

While in Cuba as a student, he won many awards including best student in Chemistry at the Cuban National Level Quizzes for 3 consecutive years where students from 35 countries then studied. He wrote an Organic Chemistry book which was meant for the preparation of the high performance students who aspired to participate in the World Olympiad of Chemistry. He was summa cum laude in all the levels of education including the medical school and the Specialty of Neurosurgery. At the end of the neurosurgical training, he wrote another book in the field of Spinal Surgery called Lumbosacral Discopathies.

When he completed the Neurosurgical course in 2001, the people of Belize found him and took him to that country as they needed Neurosurgical Services which they had never had the privilege of enjoying locally. He performed simple and complex surgeries on many people including the elite of Belize with no surgical mortality in his 5 consecutive years of practice.

In the US, under Dr. Robert Grossman, a well-known neurosurgeon, he worked as a Clinical Research Specialist where he was invited by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons of America to present six papers in their international conferences.

6. The Problem

With the booming economy, health care delivery which is one of the faces of economic growth needs to improve in Ghana. When those who have the resources need to get medical care, they go to South Africa, India, America and other developed nations because there is no facility in the West African sub region to find an appreciable level of quality health care.

Considered a regional model for political and economic reform, Ghana has to appear as a flag bearer of health care delivery not only for its people but also for West Africa as many patients from the sub region flock to Ghana looking for a better medical care. Meanwhile, Ghana itself does not have facilities like those in the developed countries and the countries with emerging economies.

Why the need for an International Hospital? Not simply because our West African neighbors still come to Ghana for medical care but also we sustain the vision of having our medical center used by patients beyond the borders of Africa.

The leading government hospitals in the West African subregion are not fully equipped. In the areas in which they are well-equipped, maintenance of equipment is problematic. This is because this is not done in a timely manner, or there are no government funds available in that moment in time to carry out the maintenance/repair. We lack some specialties and medical equipment which will ultimately prevent the flock of patients abroad. The efforts of having a strategic plan for training human resources, especially general medical practitioners, specialists, nurses and other allied health workers at home or abroad for the challenges the health sector is facing or will face in the short term or long term have not yet yielded the expected outcomes. A sustained plan of training the adequate quality and quantity of the new generation that will take the baton when the current generation is gone does not seem to be yielding the expected results.

Because of the inadequate attention to preventive medicine, all the government hospitals are choked with patients. In this atmosphere, only the well-connected and economically solvent get access to a swift medical care in both the out-patient department and the usual 18 month long queues for surgery. The fact is that many of them will suffer from pains and/or die waiting.

Having all our health care needs locally is the only way we can stop the efflux of the rich abroad for a better health care when they are also dying in their numbers if it is an emergency condition that does not allow for a sufficient waiting window for its transfer outside the country.

We do not have local experts on the diagnosis and treatment of brain aneurysm which is an emergency condition that continues to claim the lives of many in this country. A patient who needs a complex spinal surgery to avoid or improve the condition of paralysis due to a spinal cord injury is in a similar situation because whether the person can pay or cannot pay there is no amount of money that can save his life since emergency treatment is not available in the country.

Some of our medical practices in Ghana need to catch up with time. For example, in the field of Spine Surgery, the technique of laminectomy which was used to treat lumbar disc herniations in the 1960's is still used in Ghana today due to deeply rooted paradigms, leaving patients not only with big scars on the back but also with an unnecessary destruction of the bony structures that guarantee stability to the spine.

The agents of change are coming into the system every year after undergoing training in the developed countries, but they are either absorbed by the status quo or they are marginalized to health facilities where they do not have the tools to effect those changes for the benefit of the people. They end up giving in to the status quo, so the teaching hospitals do not always experience the changes that the new brains coming into the system could bring.

We still lack some medical services in Ghana after 60 years of independence. This is because of ineffective strategic planning particularly for the training of specialists in the fields where there are deficits. There appears to be a lack of commitment to insert those new specialists into the system after their training in terms of giving them practical support like getting ready the equipment they need to work on their return to the country and the necessary basic incentives. When this happens, the danger is that there is a brain drain back to the developed countries where there were trained. The common denominator of the private hospitals in Ghana is that they are poorly equipped. They do not have the latest radiological and pathological investigations/equipment and many of them lack well-supplied pharmacies. All of them lack Critical Care Units. As a result of this, we see patients moving from one facility to the other trying to complete an investigation for diagnosis before their doctors are able to treat them. Once the final treatment is prescribed, they have to move around the city looking for the medication.

Some of the pathology samples have to be sent abroad for analysis. Some surgical treatments have to be done abroad because of lack of equipment and/or lack of the trained personnel to execute them.

This will the first time ever a project of its type is launched in Ghana and West Africa and it is expected to emerge as the health tourism facility in the subregion. Till now the major government hospitals in the subregion are better equipped both in gadgets and human resources to handle a variety and severity of conditions that the private hospitals, in their deficit, refer the patients to. As a result of this, the wealthy and the influential are flocking abroad to solve their health issues. Some who are middle class members of the society or are sponsored by the wealthy to go abroad do complain about the additional air ticket that needs to be paid for themselves and their families to India and South Africa. Let us not talk about Europe and North America where the cost of health care is exorbitant if you don’t carry a good health insurance. Foreign health tourism does not allow patients to recover in the emotional company of their family members and friends. Corporate organizations and government agencies are increasingly covering their workers with health insurance and we could positively tap into that for the sustainability of revenue. In the private sector, we shall not have paralleled competitors if our product strives to be affordably competitive.

Though the economy of Ghana has faced a bit of challenges over the past few years, the situation is now stabilizing and Ghana has emerged as the fastest growing economy in the West African subregion with a projected growth of 7.6% in 2019. Let us not forget that in spite of the circumstances which prevail in a country at a given time, there is always the need for health care services as people continue to fall sick/ill in times of peace, in times of war, in times of prosperity and in times of economic hardship and humankind and their loved ones will always do what it takes to recover their health by the use of health facilities.

The foreign personnel who live and work here and those on short visit to the region need the specialized health care facilities at the height of the developed countries to live/travel peacefully so that they do not die due to those emergency conditions whose treatment do not wait for transfer to specialized centers in the developed countries.

Dangerous conditions like the Ebola Virus Disease are emerging and threatening to invade the world from Africa and if we do not have first class health facilities not only the poor people of Africa will die but also the foreign aides/visitors who travel to our region to help in our socioeconomic development or simply for cultural exchange.

7. Societal Need

The inspiration came from the fact that, for some time now, the people of Ghana have been looking for a health care service that will provide all specialties, all medical treatments and all the latest medical equipment which will ultimately promote the quality of life, prevent the death of patients and avoid their flock abroad in search of the standards that are not available in Ghana.

Therefore, there is the need for a hospital that will serve to:

  • establish health care facilities to improve the delivery of health care in Ghana and our West Africa sub region.
  • reduce remarkably the flock of patients abroad.
  • reduce the loss of life of patients including that of foreigners in cases of emergency conditions which, at the moment, do not have treatment within the borders of Ghana putting patients’ life at the risk of death by the time they get to the country where treatment is available.
  • provide the foreigners, tourists, the diplomatic corps, and the corporate bodies with an option for excellent health care within Ghana.

train health and allied health human resources to help close the gap of deficit we currently have in the country.The inspiration came from the fact that, for some time now, the people of Ghana have been looking for a health care service that will provide all specialties, all medical treatments and all the latest medical equipment which will ultimately promote the quality of life, prevent the death of patients and avoid their flock abroad in search of the standards that are not available in Ghana.

Therefore, there is the need for a hospital that will serve to:

  • establish health care facilities to improve the delivery of health care in Ghana and our West Africa sub region.
  • reduce remarkably the flock of patients abroad.
  • reduce the loss of life of patients including that of foreigners in cases of emergency conditions which, at the moment, do not have treatment within the borders of Ghana putting patients’ life at the risk of death by the time they get to the country where treatment is available.
  • provide the foreigners, tourists, the diplomatic corps, and the corporate bodies with an option for excellent health care within Ghana.
  • train health and allied health human resources to help close the gap of deficit we currently have in the country.
8. Technical Proposal

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT

Health Facility

A comprehensive private international hospital with all the specialties and specialists, all the latest equipment, a complete pathology laboratory, Critical Care Units for different purposes and a well-supplied pharmacy is what we need in Ghana. This will permit a more efficient medical attention to patients. It will not only save cost but also it will save thousands of the lives of both nationals and foreigners who die because they suffer from emergency conditions whose treatment is unavailable in the country at the moment.

These International Hospitals which shall be health tourism facilities are expected to be the number one in class hospitals in the West Africa sub-region. Apart from patients of West Africa, it will also attract the USA and other developed countries' workers, United Nations (UN) workers, the diplomatic corps, corporate bodies in the region and other tourists who will come to Ghana to look for that medical service which is available only in our medical facility in the entire subregion.

The vision of an International Hospital is that it will be opened to doctors from all walks of life, regardless of their country of origin and culture. This will create the necessary dynamism for a good medical team to take off.

Health Professionals

We, the Ghanaian medical students, trained in Cuba are also in our numbers in the system. We have Neurosurgeons, a Cardiovascular Surgeon, a Cardiologist, Gynecologists, Ophthalmologists, Pediatricians, General Surgeons, a Radiologist, an Anesthesiologist, an Orthopedic Surgeon, and a Critical Care Specialist, among others. There are some outside Ghana studying Emergency Medicine and other specialties.

In Ghana for instance, the Cuban trained medical practitioners could collaborate with those locally trained to candle the objective of this vision. This group will serve as the basis for those Ghanaian doctors who are undergoing training outside Ghana to join them on their return.

There are some specialties which we lack in Ghana or have very few specialists representing them. The International Hospital will solve these deficiencies through foreign doctors who will fill the initial vacant slots. The hospital will also attract Cuban health workers that can now travel freely outside Cuba. The hospital will also be reinforced by American doctors who will come to Ghana to treat patients and share their experience with their colleagues in Ghana. Some doctors are coming from India, Central and South America and Eastern Europe.

This private facility, one of its kind in Ghana, will be the bridge between the inadequacies of the government and private facilities. The International Hospital will be a Tertiary Health Care Facility with first class capacity to cater for all the health needs of the people.

Health Care Delivery

We shall also introduce the practice of telemedicine linking our centers with each other and our headquarters with sister mega hospitals in the developed world and at the same time with underdeveloped medical centers in Ghana which will refer patients to our facility in order to improve  our  health care delivery. We will use technology to televise/videotape surgeries in real time which are done in Ghana to the United States of America and other nations by networking both hospitals so that colleagues with their expertise in those countries can give us valuable opinion on difficult cases. Other methods of information and communications technology (ICT) will be applied in both surgical and nonsurgical specialties. We shall use ICT to make our distant services available to referring medical centers in Ghana so that before patients with head injury, spinal cord injury, heart attack and stroke come to our center they would coordinate with us and know the appropriate course of action they would need to execute initially before referring the patients. The hospital will be fully computerized and the documents which at that time cannot be computerized will be scanned and kept in the computer so that patient information and other matters which pertain to the hospital will be well kept for future references.

Private Health Insurance Schemes have emerged and have come to stay as the booming economy has increased their demand. The hospital will be a provider for these private health insurances. The rest of the patients will pay out of pocket fully or on payment plans.

Target Group

We target all patients independent of their origin, religion, culture, race, ethnicity and political affiliation seeking for solution to health issues.

Location

We will build the first facility in the city of Accra, the capital of Ghana. This is where much of the population of the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area lives and where 55% of the doctors, nurses and other allied health personnel of Ghana are concentrated in order to get an easier access to human resources. This is going to be a Tertiary Health Facility with 100 beds.

We will also extend a smaller branch to Takoradi, in the Western Region of Ghana, a city in the vicinity where the petroleum and mining industries are booming. The petroleum industry will receive this with a good pleasure because their workers, among who are many foreigners, have a private health insurance and there is no first quality hospital that they can attend for their health needs.

Kumasi, being the second largest city in Ghana with abundant economic activity, is another city our branches will go to.

In the future, a branch of the Wonder International Hospitals will be open as a health tourism facility for our international patients at the bank of the beautiful Volta River near Bunase in the Greater Accra Region, which is only an hour drive from the capital city, Accra. Bunase is going to be the site for the new international airport which will become the center of West Africa to the world in the travel and pleasure industry. Apart from this huge international airport, there will be an Airport City with skyscrapers of the Dubai style, the seat of the government and all the ministries, an Olympic Stadium among other infrastructures.

This health tourism facility at the bank of the Volta River will be located on the grounds of The Kingdom City which will be funded under the Cosmopolitan Aid Foundation, a non-profit organization, our philanthropic arm. The Kingdom City is the complex of massive projects through local and outreach programmes, that will help alleviate the problems of the helpless, the destitute, the orphans and vulnerable children, the widows and their children, the elderly, the mentally disabled, the physically disabled including the deaf and the blind, students, patients and the public at large. We are acquiring 25, 000 acres of land extending from the Volta River to an area behind the new International Airport in Bunase, to build The Kingdom City. As coalition builders, in the effort of making our NGO projects become auto-sustainable in the future, we will work co-operatively with all individuals and groups, for profit and not for profit corporations and organisations, with government agencies and international bodies committed to the fight to extend help to the needy. We are presently, calling on the aforementioned entities and groups to partner with us to make this dream, which is achievable, to come to fruition. During this partnership, the profit of the joint venture will be shared between our foundation and our partners so that we can accomplish our mission of helping thousands of vulnerable to make it to stardom.   

The Kingdom City will be comprised of:

  1. Home and school for orphans and vulnerable children
  2. Center for the empowerment of widows
  3. School and center for the empowerment of the physically disabled
  4. Mental Health Center
  5. Nursing for the elderly
  6. University
  7. Hospital
  8. Shopping Mall
  9. Chain of Hotels at the river bank and inland
  10. Museums
  11. Recreational Centers
  12. Aquarium
  13. Zoo
  14. Amusement parks
  15. Sports Complex
  16. Apartments and Hostels for our workers and volunteers
  17. Chain of offices for commercial use
  18. Residential Area.

In the future all the branches will serve as referral sources for the headquarters in cases where patients need more sophisticated investigations or more specialized care as is the case of some complex cardiothoracic and brain and spinal surgeries.

Implementation Plan

We will get foreign contractors to perform a solid construction at the same level of the developed countries.

Operational Plan

The first of the projects to be built is the one in the city of Accra. It will be built in the heart of Accra, where the population of more 4 million people of the Accra Metropolitan Area are concentrated. The hospital in Accra will have 100 beds, all the state-of-the-arts equipment and all the medical specialties. We are currently in the process of acquiring a 6.2-acre plot in the center of Accra for this purpose.

9. Financial Proposal

BUDGET:

We have contacted Bouygues Batiment International, a French Construction Company, with an important presence in Canada and the USA that is building the Ridge Hospital in Accra, Ghana. Bouygues is looking at approximately $500,000.00 USD per bed taking into account both the building, furniture and hospital equipment. Our 100-bed facility will be $ 50 million USD. We are yet to talk to two more international construction firms. For this, we shall also contact Simed International BV of the Netherlands and Madala Health Inc of New York, USA. We are opened to contractors who have worked with you previously with a good track record. The essence is reducing cost without affecting the quality.

10. Synergy

Our organization is grounded on the values of Integrity, Compassion, Accountability, Respect and Excellence (I CARE) principle.

We believe that the future of medicine depends upon bringing together organizations and health care partners in mutually beneficial joint ventures that help them connect, integrate and collaborate.

  • With your collaboration, we seek to provide quality health care that will make a difference by improving the health of the people of Ghana and Africa at large.
  • This collaboration will facilitate access to an affordable and trusted medical alternative for patients, organizations and consumers on the Africa market.
  • With your collaboration we will offer world leading, affordable, timely, high quality and all inclusive, surgical and non- surgical specialties, diagnostic and therapeutic tools for Ghana and Africa at large, to access best in class health care facilities.
  • This collaboration will continue to create opportunities in Africa thereby increasing market share while improving patient care.
  • Increasing the revenue and profitability base of the company for future developments and sustainability.
  • Impact investing, as it is a socially conscious form of investing that seeks to generate both a social benefit and a meaningful financial return. It is an investment that intentionally generates sound financial return as well as measurable social and environmental impact and this would help grow the global impact economy, especially that of Ghana, significantly.
  • It will help train doctors, nurses and allied health personnel who will reduce our chronic deficit of medical personnel.
  • It will not only create jobs for thousands who will be directly and indirectly involved here at home but also in your nation and all other countries where our contractors, construction materials and medical and non-medical equipment are coming from.
  • We would have all the tests done locally in Ghana which has a population of 25 million and have influential impact on 350 million people who will come from other West African countries as they usually do.
  • Patients, both the foreigners and nationals, will be tremendously helped by avoiding their flock to South Africa, India and the first world countries.
  • Your organization will leave an indelible mark of goodwill, whose name will ever be remembered in the annals of history for the good they have done to elevate the quality of health care in Ghana, extending to Africa as a whole.